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Results: 75 Articles found.

Flossing, Yes! Flossing Using Your Hair, No.

How do you remove food stuck between your teeth? Dental floss? Great. Folded paper or strands of hair? Not the best idea.

 

No More Fillings for Your Cavities? New Options Show Promise

Tooth decay, which can lead to cavities, is the most common dental disease worldwide. The traditional treatment for cavities has been fillings. However, fillings are not an ideal solution, as they often need to be replaced once or more during a person's lifetime.

 

Do You Have a "Successful Smile"?

What do people think about your smile? Would they describe it as "effective," "genuine," and "pleasant"?​

 

Teeth are a Window to Our Ancestry

Did you know that your teeth can provide information about your whole-body health? This insight has allowed scientists to discover much about early human health history. A study published in the journal Current Anthropology describes how scientists have discovered a way to examine ancient human teeth for signs of vitamin D deficiency. It's fascinating look back into the past, as these studies have provided surprising information.

 

PTSD Linked to Oral and Facial Pain

Nearly 25 million people in the U.S. suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), representing a significant portion of the population. Researchers from the University of São Paulo recently found that PTSD can increase the potential for oral pain, facial pain, and problems with the biomechanics of chewing.

 

Jaw Pain? Tick It Off the List

With experts reporting an increase in some tick-borne diseases, don't be surprised when your dentist asks about your history of tick bites if you mention face or jaw pain.

 

Are You Eating Your Way to Tooth Loss?

Have you lost one or more teeth? Then it may be helpful to have a discussion with an implant dentist about the types of food you eat.

 

Chewing sugar-free Gum Could Save Over $4 Billion in Dental Visits

While you may not save $4.1 billion yourself, you might save a significant amount of money by using sugar-free gum to help prevent tooth decay.

 

How Menopause May Be Affecting Your Dental Health – and a Possible Solution

Along with the list of symptoms already associated with menopause, a study published in the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine found that estrogen deficiency may be a cause of dental health problems. The researchers concluded that bone loss, weak and brittle teeth, and diseases associated with the areas surrounding teeth can be indicators that a hormone problem may be present.

 

Your Dentist Might Be the First to Notice Your High Blood Pressure

Everyone knows regular visits to the dentist are important. But they may be even more beneficial than you thought. Why? Because you might have hypertension without realizing it. Often referred to as high blood pressure, hypertension often has no significant signs or symptoms, yet it can cause serious health problems.

 

Which is Better for Your Oral Health: Vaping or Smoking?

If you want to protect your oral heath, should you: A) Vape B) Smoke The answer is “None of the above."

 

Dental Phobia Increases Likelihood of Cavities and Missing Teeth

Are you afraid to go to the dentist? Ironically, this may increase your need to visit the dentist.

 

Your Gum Disease May Be Linked to Your Stroke Risk

Red, swollen gums may not seem important. But they may signal a greater risk for something that could change your life dramatically: a stroke.

 

Hormone Therapy: Better Bones, Better Sex Drive … and Better Teeth?

Estrogen therapy has already been credited with helping women manage difficulties with menopause. These include the reduction of hot flashes, improved heart health and bone density, and maintaining levels of sexual satisfaction.

 

Fast Food Can Be Worse for Your Health Than You Thought

Fast food being bad for your waistline is hardly news. The fact that fast food can also be bad for your oral health might surprise some people. Three examples of the negative effects of fast food on your oral health were cited by Russell Roderick, DMD recently in Dentistry Today.

 

Are Bleeding Gums Linked to Premature Babies?

Are you at risk for delivering a premature baby? Your gums might provide part of the answer. The relationship between the the oral health of the mother and the health of a baby has been shown in several studies.

 

Are Low Testosterone and Gum Infection Linked?

There is a debate in the medical community as to whether there is an association between low testosterone and chronic periodontitis, a serious infection of the gums.

 

Crooked Teeth Tied to Balance and Posture

Could fixing the alignment of your teeth lead to better balance and posture?

 

Tooth Loss Associated with Decline in Functional Capacity

A recent study among older adults in Japan found that tooth loss is associated with future decline in higher-level functional capacity.

 

Improving Your Diet Can Improve Your Oral Health

A recent study found that diet can have a profound effect on oral health. Specifically, a diet low in carbohydrates, rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, rich in vitamins C and D, and rich in fibers can significantly reduce gingival and periodontal inflammation.

 

Long Term Marijuana Use Linked to Periodontal (Gum) Disease

Is marijuana use bad for your health? With an evolving legal climate for marijuana in the United States, researchers recently looked for the answer to that question.

 

Diabetes, Older Age, and Lack of Flossing Puts You at Greater Risk of Tooth Loss

Previous studies have shown that patients with diabetes have a higher prevalence of dental loss and periodontal disease. Specifically, if a person has diabetes, he or she is almost 1-1/2 times more likely to lose their teeth compared to a healthy person without diabetes.

 

Oral Bacteria May Reveal Pancreatic Cancer Risk

The presence of certain bacteria in the mouth may reveal increased risk for pancreatic cancer and enable earlier, more precise treatment. That was the primary finding of a study conducted at the NYU Langone Medical Center and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center.

 

Cancer Treatment Offers Oral Health Challenges

Cancer survival rates continue to improve, which is good news. However, current cancer treatments can lead to oral health issues and affect a patient's quality of life, so it's important that cancer patient work closely with not only their physician, but their dentist.

 

Why It's Important to Discuss Medications with Your Implant Dentist

As a patient, getting a dental implant can seem simple, straightforward, and easy. But that is primarily because your implant dentist is highly trained, experienced, and in the case of those credentialed by AAID, a dental implant expert.

 

Mouth Breathing at Night May Lead to More Dental Cavities

If you breathe through your mouth while sleeping, it could lead to dental issues that include tooth decay and erosion.

 

Poor Dental Health May Be a Risk Factor for Depression

Poor dental health has previously been linked to depression. Now researchers have found that your oral health could also be a risk factor for this mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest.

 

Can Good Oral Health Help Slow Dementia?

A recent study conducted among individuals with mild to moderate dementia raises interesting questions about the relationship between oral health and dementia. Specifically, the study found that the presence of gum disease was associated with a six-fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline.

 

Dental Education Needed for Patients with Bulimia

In a survey of women with bulimia, an eating disorder associated with vomiting, more than 90 percent said they had dental problems. It has previously been found that vomiting can cause issues with tooth enamel and mouth sores, among other oral problems.

 

Is Morning Breath Inevitable?

"Morning breath," the bad breath associated with waking up in the morning, is a universal condition. The reason? The reduced production of saliva while asleep.

 

Brushing Your Teeth Never Sounded So Good

Do you find brushing your teeth boring? If so, you're not alone. However, if that boredom leads to inconsistent or poor quality brushing, that can be bad for your oral health. Over time, poor brushing habits can lead to cavities and gingivitis, not to mention bad breath.

 

Red Wine: Good for Health But Not Oral Health?

People have heard about the possible health benefits of red wine, but should be concerned about the effect of alcohol on their oral health. Alcoholic drinks such as red wine can leave a mark on your teeth, according to Dentistry Today.

 

Wearing Dentures While Sleeping Increases Pneumonia Risk

Don't wear dentures during sleep. That is the conclusion of a recent study that suggests that doing doing so could double the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

 

Wearing Dentures While Sleeping Increases Pneumonia Risk

Don't wear dentures during sleep. That is the conclusion of a recent study that suggests that doing doing so could double the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

 

Possible BPA Link to Tooth Defect Identified

A tooth enamel defect affecting up to 18 percent of children ages 6 to 9 years may be linked to BPA, a recent study concluded.

 

Wearing Dentures While Sleeping Increases Pneumonia Risk

Don't wear dentures during sleep. That is the conclusion of a recent study that suggests that doing doing so could double the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

 

How is Bad Hair Related to Dental Cavities?

It may come as a surprise, but some components of your hair are related to your tooth enamel. As a result, a recent study found a link between hair disorders and the susceptibility to dental caries, the decay of teeth commonly referred to as cavities.

 

Fewer Teeth May Be Related to Lower Oral Perception and Cognitive Function

The decline of cognitive function is related to tactile and taste perceptions. That is the finding of a new study among nearly 1,000 80 year olds.

 

Poor Dental Hygiene Related to Erectile Dysfunction

If you don't take care of your mouth, it can affect other part of your body.

 

Social Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Grinding

Grinding and clenching are not caused by dental issues, but they can be a dental problem. While research has linked grinding to antidepressants, the underlying reason may be social anxiety.

 

Is Exercise Bad for Your Teeth?

A recent study found a correlation between exercise and teeth loss. While the study was relatively small, involving only 70 people, the researchers found that those who exercised more had a higher risk of rotting teeth. Specifically, the risk of decay correlated with the amount of timing spent training. ​

 

Diabetes Not a Problem for Dental Implant Usage

Have you held off on dental implants because you have uncontrolled diabetes? According to a recent study, dental implants were found to be safe for patients with uncontrolled diabetes.

 

Could Wearing Dentures Negatively Impact Your Life?

A recent study found that dentures have a significant downside. Approximately one in three denture wearers stated that wearing dentures limits their ability to live life to the fullest.

 

Do Night Owls Get More Cavities in Their Teeth?

A recent study found that teenagers that tend to stay up late at night also tend to have a higher risk for dental caries, commonly referred to as cavities. The risk was nearly four times higher for these "night owls" than their early-riser counterparts.

 

Do Night Owls Get More Cavities in Their Teeth

A recent study found that teenagers that tend to stay up late at night also tend to have a higher risk for dental caries, commonly referred to as cavities. The risk was nearly four times higher for these "night owls" than their early-riser counterparts.

 

Menopause Not to be Feared When It Comes to Tooth Loss and Periodontal Disease

While menopause influences many physical changes, there is no significant evidence that it contributes to tooth loss or periodontal disease. So says a small study that was recently conducted among menopausal and premenopausal women, all of whom suffered from chronic periodontitis. Chronic periodontitis is a common disease of the oral cavity with symptoms that may include redness or bleeding of the gums.

 

Vitamin D in Pregnancy May Reduce Cavities After Birth

If you want your child to have healthy teeth, the time to start down that path is while you are still pregnant.

 

Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Increases Risk of Cavities in Children

Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Increases Risk of Cavities in Children Exposure to secondhand smoke at a young age is associated with an increased risk of cavities, concludes a recent study.

 

Diabetes Not a Problem for Dental Implant Usage

Have you held off on dental implants because you have uncontrolled diabetes? According to a recent study, dental implants were found to be safe for patients with uncontrolled diabetes.

 

Hookah Smoking Associated with Serious Health Problems

Research has debunked that misconception that smoking from a waterpipe is safer than smoking a cigarette. ​

 

Kiss and Tell? Yes, Say Bacteria

Your friends may not know whom you've been kissing. But the bacteria can tell the tale.

 

Brush Your Way to Savings?

Would you connect your toothbrush to the Internet to save 40% off a root canal?

 

Thankfully Rare, Dermal Fillers Can Cause Serious Injuries

The FDA is warning that dermal fillers can cause serious injuries if inadvertently injected into blood vessels in the face, although these cases are rare.

 

Thankfully Rare, Dermal Fillers Can Cause Serious Injuries

The FDA is warning that dermal fillers can cause serious injuries if inadvertently injected into blood vessels in the face, although these cases are rare.

 

More Than Just Cosmetic: Dental Problems May Lead to Being Bullied

Dental problems can affect the appearance of anyone, and most certainly that of a child. A recent study suggests that the issue is more than cosmetic, however. The appearance and condition of a child's teeth can make that child a victim of bullying.

 

Are You Brushing Your Teeth Correctly?

Which tooth brushing technique should you use? If you aren't certain, you are in good company.

 

Which is Best for Your Teeth: An Electric Toothbrush or a Manual Toothbrush?

In the battle between electric toothbrushes and manual toothbrushes, researchers believe they have identified the winner. Electric toothbrushes come out on top when it comes to your smile.

 

Breastfeeding Could Reduce Dental Malocclusion

A recent study found that exclusive breastfeeding could protect against malocclusions in children.

 

Kiss and Tell? Yes, Say Bacteria

Your friends may not know whom you've been kissing. But the bacteria can tell the tale.

 

Diabetes Not a Problem for Dental Implant Usage

Have you held off on dental implants because you have uncontrolled diabetes? According to a recent study, dental implants were found to be safe for patients with uncontrolled diabetes.

 

Thankfully Rare, Dermal Fillers Can Cause Serious Injuries

The FDA is warning that dermal fillers can cause serious injuries if inadvertently injected into blood vessels in the face, although these cases are rare.

 

Missing Teeth? Dentures May Not Be The Answer

Not everyone who is missing teeth needs dentures, according to a quality of life study of more than 2,700 people.

 

Dental Implants Rated Higher than Dentures and False Teeth

Women with osteoporosis found higher qualities of life with dental implants than other options such as dentures and false teeth, according to recent research. The study focused on satisfaction with the work, health, emotional and sexual aspects of the women's lives.

 

Depression and Anxiety Related to Tooth Loss

Losing a tooth doesn't just affect your looks, ability to chew, and other physical characteristics. It may also affect your mental health.

 

Why Replace Missing Teeth? - video

Replacing missing teeth is much more than just having a pretty smile. Watch this video to learn more.​

 

Unusual treatment for sensitive teeth

Scientists have reported on an unusual way to prevent tooth sensitivity using a substance from a surprising source

 
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"Doc"Holliday

Want to win a bet?

Here's an interesting piece of history that just might win you a bet. What kind of doctor was "Doc" Holliday of wild west fame?

 

Cheese and cavities

Eating cheese and other dairy products may protect your teeth against cavities.

 

Dental Implants and children

Implants can even be an option for adolescents after puberty when the jaw stops growing, typically around 16 for girls and 18 for boys. It is important to talk to a dental implant specialist now, however, in preparation for the implant. You can fine one near you at /find-an-implant-dentist/

 

Which fruit smoothies cause dental health risk?

According to a new laboratory study of the erosive potential of fruit smoothies on teeth published in the February 2013 issue of the British Dental Journal, and as included in Implant Insight, those containing kiwi, apple, and lime produced over 28% surface loss in a tooth immersed in the drink for 60 minutes compared to strawberry and banana combinations, which produced less than 2% surface loss.

 

Implants traced to 600 AD

Ancient dental implants have been traced back to around 600 AD, when tooth-like pieces of shell were hammered into the jaw of a Mayan woman. Thank goodness for contemporary dentistry!

 

Look Mom, no cavities!

Cavities can’t occur in an implant-restored crown, or replacement tooth; however, you will need to visit your dentist as scheduled and clean and care for it and your gums and mouth every day, the same as you would if it were a natural tooth.

 

Natural teeth

Dental implants are the closest you can get to healthy, natural teeth. They will allow you to confidently eat, smile, laugh, talk, play and enjoy all of your regular activities of everyday life without thinking about your teeth.

 

Missing Teeth Are Common

It has been estimated that 69 percent of Americans age 35 to 44 have at least one missing tooth, and one in four over the age of 74 have lost ALL of their natural teeth.

 
 
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